TED

Saturday, November 20, 2004

“An Intimate Evening”

 

 

List of performers:

Pete Guither

Kate Smith

Jen Mickelson

The Chad (Greskiwcz)

Kate Fanis

Bridgette Richard

Thomas Muhr

Charlie

Steven

Fiona

Drew Brown

Eric Rueff

 

Italics denotes a new performer at Ted

 

Approximate Running Time:

1 hour and 50 minutes

 

Number of Pieces:

11

 

Attendance:

12

 

The Chad’s Rant:

            Thanksgiving and Fall Break be damned! Nothing’s gonna stop Ted from happening…except of course next Saturday. Never the less, everyone who came this week had a good time and went home with something to put on the fridge.

 

Host Notes:

This week’s Ted was mega cool, if I do say so myself. I was thrilled to have the privilege of saying those awe-inspiring words.

“Theatre of TED, enthusiastic applause!”

 

We started the evening with an announcement from Pete. As promised, Pete had brought the beloved Solerno Butter Cookies, but that’s not all. We were also treated to that which should always accompany good cookies, a nice glass of milk (or silk for those who prefer soy).

After that, Kate Smith read us a poem in the style of “How I Spent My Summer Vacation”/”What do you do with a BA in Theatre.” It detailed her time spent after graduating from ISU this past May including her work on “Living Canvas” and her search for a job where she could actually make use of the degree she spent so much effort into getting.

Jen Mickelson brought back some fond memories of childhood with “Old Fashioned Thanksgiving Fun.” She passed out some paper, crayons, colored pencils, and markers so we could all make hand-turkeys as she read us the poem “The Turkey Shot out of the Oven.” After everyone finished their drawings, we had show and tell, and everyone introduced us to their turkey. Look for some of these to appear in the TED display case in the lobby.

Next, I delivered my sociological essay on the cultural significance of monkeys and poop throwing. It is rare to find any in-depth discussion on this topic, and I hope that I was able to shed some light on the subject for anyone else who is interested in projectile feces.

We have all heard the song “Tunak Tunak Tun” by Daler Mhendi at TED parties, and most of us have even participated in the dance that goes along, but how many of you have seen the video? Well, everyone who attended this Saturday got to see the mind-expanding visual imagery created by the brilliant Daler Mhendi. Comets, and Earthquakes, and melting Indians, oh my! Everyone enjoyed this. Find the video and watch it if you haven’t already. Then take the time to watch it again and again until you have learned every step and can repeat it every time you hear the song.

Kate Fanis and Bridgette Richard entertained us with a silent scene. For anyone who doesn’t know what a silent scene is, it is a scene performed entirely without words. It isn’t really silent, but that’s beside the point. I wasn’t sure of all the details in the scene, but apparently there was something on Kate’s butt. That would explain why I was staring at it the whole time.

Up next was first-time performer Thomas Muhr. Thomas came to us with a poem entitled “I’m Afraid of Democrats.” It was a rant that seemed mostly concerned with the propaganda that had been spread around by democrats and Michael Moore in the past year. Personally, I thought it was nice to hear a political message that was not “I hate Bush, I hate Bush, I hate Bush.” And more importantly, the poem was pretty good. I hope we see some more of you Thomas.

The Chad came to the stage with a poem entitled “36 Hours of Fame.” The poem detailed his heroic feat of playing 36 consecutive hours of foursquare without taking a break. It’s no Iliad or Odyssey, but then again, The Chad is not blind or Greek.

Perhaps the most socially important piece of the evening was Pete with “Ted Merchandise.” I cannot give away too many details, as it may be reprised at the next Ted. I will submit the details as an addendum on next Sunday.

Especially heart warming was Bridgette’s tale of pedophilic love. It turns out that Bridgette has been engaged for several weeks to a young man named Trey. Trey is 6 years old and is enrolled in Kindergarten at Oakdale Elementary for the second time (that’s right; Bridgette likes the bad boys). He proposed by saying "Hey Bridgette? I can see up your nose. Will you marry me?" It was love from the first. Unfortunately, the ring turned out to be stolen, and Bridgette had to return it. It’s not the worst relationship I’ve ever seen, but far from the best. I give their marriage a year at best.

Our final piece of the night was Kate Fanis with an explanation and demonstration of “The Living Canvas.” I feel sorry for all who missed it because it was fantastic. Before long, half the audience (including myself) was up in front of the projector showing what we got. Thanks again Pete for spicing things up with projector and laptop.

After all of this, what more could a good host say except, “Theatre of Ted, Enthusiastic Applause!”

 

Performance pieces:

Pete with milk (or silk) and cookies

Kate S. with a bad poem

Jen with old-fashioned Thanksgiving fun

The Chad with “Monkeys and Poop”

Pete with “Tunak Tunak Tun”

Kate F. and Bridgette with a silent scene

Thomas Muhr with “I’m Afraid of Democrats”

The Chad with “36 Hours of Fame”

Pete with “Ted Merchandise”

Bridgette’s engagement announcement

Kate F. with a “Living Canvas” demonstration

 

Awards:

 

 

Piece(s) of the week:

Pete with “Tunak Tunak Tun” and Jen with old-fashioned Thanksgiving fun

 

Dare to Suck Award:

Thomas with “I’m Afraid of Democrats”

 

Jaw dropper:

Bridgette’s engagement announcement

 

Special Award:

Best Hand Turkey:

1st Place: Kate Fanis with the Pirate Foot Turkey

2nd Place: Jen Mickelson with the 42 Turkey

Last Place: Bridgette with the Mutant Foot Turkey

 

 

Super Secret Theme: The theme tonight was definitely a return to youthful innocence. We made hand turkeys, danced, and sang Thanksgiving songs just as we did when we were young: before we knew about the disgusting exploitation and slaughter of Native Americans. Ah, how vividly my childhood returns to me.